Welcome

Welcome to the homepage of the Rosenmund research lab. Neurons in the brain transmit information to each other through specialized connections called synapses. This process is initiated when the action potential invades the presynaptic terminal, which in turn causes the fusion of transmitter-filled vesicles with the presynaptic membrane releasing its content. Then transmitters can diffuse through the synaptic cleft and activate postsynaptic receptors thereby altering the postsynaptic membrane potential. This process is highly complex yet occurs with amazing speed and astonishing precision millions of times at every second within our brain. Moreover, functional properties of synapses within the brain can vary dramatically and can undergo rapid and lasting changes, and this in turn affect how information in the brain are encoded, and even how we learn and forget, how we think and feel, how we sense our environment and act.

The Rosenmund lab studies basic principles of synaptic transmission with a major focus on the process of neurotransmitter release. We use electrical and optical recording techniques to study synapses in their function and plasticity. We also use light and electron microscopy to study the structure of synapses and how these structures change during plastic events and under pathophysiological conditions. We use molecular and genetic techniques to connect individual synaptic proteins with individual steps of neurotransmitter release. These techniques are also powerful tools in studying the mechanisms that underly diseases such as epilepsy, autism, schizophrenia and many other neurological disorders. Dramatic advances in the field of human and molecular genetics have shown that these diseases are in part synaptopathic, as these diseases are often associated with mutation in synaptic proteins.

 

+++ NEWS +++